Metformin (Glucophage) use with carb-heavy meals for better nutrient utilization

subzeronation

New member

Here is Glucolog explained by its creator, Guerrilla Chemist for Blackstone Labs.


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Msfit

New member

Always a good intervention :) You're right, it was a very high dosage for me but we do mistakes and we learn from them. Thank God that I didn't take it for long and it didn't do any damage because I understood it on time that there were other good options. 

 

 

Msfit

New member

I still have a lot to learn in this very complex sport but if I can help, I'm always available for that :)

 

swolesam

New member

i love learning something new everyday, but we need to be near damn scientists to figure out all the chemical interactions happening in the body :) Between experimenting which i love to do, and getting labs & analyzing them, and trying new protocols/products, its a full time job but the picture gets to be clearer & clearer and results seem to be more impressive as progress is made over time. 

Great stuff.

 

blastthru23

Moderator

And when messing with both the exocrine and endocrine systems there never a simple one to one relationship. One hormone, or protein controls another almost endlessly. It's as though when you add one, you have to account for the imbalance your body perceives, and add something else, or just know and accept the negatives in view of the benefits, and know when change dosage, or discontinue the exogenously administered hormone or peptide. It's tricky business this biology thing!

 
M

Mister A

Guest

The primary failure with anti-diabetic drugs such as Metformin is their inability to direct glucose specifically into the muscle cell. The secondary failure stems from the ignorance of the user.

 

swolesam

New member

true! but isnt that an issue with ALL nutrition portioning agents? That they basically help shuttle the glucose OUT of the blood and either into the liver or muscle or fat cells IN THAT ORDER? 

 

blastthru23

Moderator

Insulin is a regulatory hormone primarily. Most call it a storage hormone. Storage is a result of regulating blood sugar levels. It removes glucose from the blood in a manner it is accustomed to per the lifestyle of the individual. Muscle can only hold so much, so the couch potato gets glucose stored in fat cells since the muscle is not used much and likely has plenty of glycogen. Its my undestanding, which may be and likely is askew to a degree, that its lifestyle that really determines what depository gets the deposit. In some sense, insulin is like a money manager seeking to keep finances balanced.

 

swolesam

New member

i hear different bro. from my understanding its an order insulin goes through. 1st it checks the liver and the muscles, if their glycogen stores are not full, it deposits there. If they are full, then it goes to store into fat cells.

So when you stimulate your muscles in weights session, you deplete their glycogen stores, hence they recommend spiking insulin after workouts to promote shuttling the glycogen-depleted muscle cells with glucose. 

i dont know if im right or wrong, i just remmeber watching & reading too many sources saying this.

 

blastthru23

Moderator

I was doing some searching around to further my understanding of glucose disposal, and hopefully add something of interest to the conversation. I found that perhaps there isn't necessarily a hierarchy of disposal (such as liver->skeletal muscle->adipose), but more of an allotment by percentage to various tissues. I have included a small excerpt and diagram from an in depth article discussing glucose disposal (which goes well beyond mere insulin. Other hormones involved are glucogon, cortisol, epinephrine, growth hormone, and FFA, or free fatty acids).   For the purposes of explanantion, the diagram shows 100g of glucose ingested. First, the liver takes the full 100g, keeping 30g for a variety of purposes beyond mere storage. The liver then releases 70g to be delivered to other tissues and organs. 27g to muscle tissue, 15g to the brain, 8g to the kidneys, and 5g to adipose tissue. Thus, glucose disposal is a bit more complex than a hierarchical model. For the complete article click the link:


https://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda.../9780387098401-c1.pdf?


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