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    cabergolin

    does caber make anyone else crazy tired?

    #2
    Nope
    may be your prolactin in zero now?)))))

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      #3
      How much dosage you using weekly?

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        #4
        about .5 to maybe 1 mg lol

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          #5
          What time of day do you take. IMO it should be taken at night before bed with your baby aspirin and time released nician

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            #6
            last time I took it at night. I just woke up exhausted. I take low dose asprin and niacin in the morning. maybe ill try to time released niacin at night.

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              #7
              You can always split it, if you can. You will get much more benfit taking the baby aspirin and nician at night

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              • Papa.Smurf0311
                Papa.Smurf0311 commented
                Editing a comment
                hey whats the type of niacin that I actually need. I have sustained release. should i get the other kind? also, is baby asprin and low dose asprin the same? mine is 81 mg.

              #8
              I use flush-free Niacian @ 500mg from Spring Valley. I take one before bed and one when I wake up. Yes baby aspirin is the same as low dose 81mg.

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                #9
                cool thanks zewi. i take my niacin in the morning and around 5 pm. maybe i could switch it to before bedtime. i just didnt want it to keep me up

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                  #10
                  Great advise Zewi

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                    #11
                    If you're following cabergoline cabaser is on the market with its new box. And of course a product of quality.

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                      #12
                      It's important for you to take charge of your own health by becoming educated so that you can take action and collaborate with your healthcare providers, but please don't try to self-treat if you have any serious signs or symptoms of disease. If you've already seen your family doctor, I'd recommend seeing a gynecologist or an endocrinologist for this condition.

                      Is breast milk secretion for a non-pregnant woman normal? Although this discharge isn't "normal," it's not uncommon. In fact non-pregnant women, men and young babies can experience galactorrhea, also called "inappropriate lactation." It's usually caused by a sudden change in hormone levels, for any number of different reasons. Up to 25% of women will experience this in their lifetime. But it's important to get it sorted out.
                      https://www.wubmed.org/blog/genbrain...t-scam-or-not/
                      The causes are many, making the differential diagnosis a challenge. There are three primary chemicals or hormones that are needed to cause lactation -- estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin. Prolactin levels are often the culprit when there is a discharge from the nipple. Prolactin is made and released by the pituitary gland. The pituitary is often called the master gland because it regulates many of the other glands in our body. Sometimes the pituitary will have a little extra growth, a non-cancerous tumor generally called an adenoma or more specifically a prolactinoma, that interferes with how much prolactin gets released into the system.

                      If the benign tumor gets big enough, however, it can cause vision problems, vertigo, headaches, or nausea and vomiting, by putting pressure on the nerves that run next to the hypothalamus and pituitary. If you have these symptoms, or if you ever have a discharge of blood, pus or yellow or green fluid, you'll want to see your doc at your earliest opportunity.

                      The doctor will generally do an MRI to monitor the size of the pituitary as well as the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is part of the brain that translates nerve impulses to hormone expression in the pituitary. The hypothalamus sits right on top of the pea-sized pituitary gland, which is about two inches behind the bridge of your nose, at the base of the brain.
                      Last edited by Tenkrat; 08-01-2020, 09:09 AM.

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